Impact News

Responding to Violence, Suicide, Psychosis and Trauma

“Outsiders”

A new “fringe theatre style” workshop by Dr Iain Bourne using drama and narration to explore the world of personality disorders. Full details to follow – in the meantime send an email enquiry to Iain

The term “Personality Disorder” has infiltrated common parlance and is often used with great laxity in professional circles to refer to “bothersome people like that.” To do so, however, not only displays a lack of knowledge but is discriminatory and prejudicial. Even those with a more informed understanding of the concept often struggle to articulate the difference between personality disorder and mental illness.

A simple comparison may help. Many consider Obsessive-compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD) to be a less serious form of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) – when in many ways they are polar opposites. People with OCPD tend to be unemotional and detached with a strong liking for order and precision in their life, are fussy, inflexible and strongly dislike change – and that is the way they prefer to be! People with OCD have a distinct mental illness with a clear neurological component in which their life, against their will, is overrun by unwanted and often distasteful intrusive thoughts and an inability to refrain from rituals and checking behaviour that they acknowledge as pointless and irrational. People with OCD are often very emotional, acutely aware of their disorder and desperate to change. Similar differences are seen in other conditions such as schizophrenia vs schizotypal personality disorder.

Actually when most people refer to “PD” they are not usually referring to OCPD but either Borderline Personality Disorder – a very real and distressing condition – or Antisocial Personality – a much vaguer condition that attempts to medicalise the criminal mind.

Both conditions are explored in “Outsiders” alongside other PDs to:

* Aid our understanding of the condition from the service user’s perspective
* Address our own biases and prejudices
* Feel more confident in challenging other professionals whose use of the term may be discriminatory
* Identify targeted strategies to assist service users in developing more fulfilled lives

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Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, Uncategorized, , , , , ,

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