Impact News

Responding to Violence, Suicide, Psychosis and Trauma

Dangerous Behaviour: Open Programme Workshop, London, 25.04.15

Due to the cutbacks it has become near impossible for individual applicants to attend the “Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour” workshop which is now almost exclusively an “in-house” bespoke programme. None-the-less, Mosaic Training are hosting an open course in London on 25th April. As this may be the only opportunity this year and you are interested, you should act quickly. The workshop costs only £89.95 and details can be found here

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Skills in Managing Dangerous Psychotic Behaviour – Part Two

The second part to my YouTube discussion of Psychosis Containment Skills is now available at

Enjoy!

Iain

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“Facing Danger” now available in Kindle format

Amazon have now made “Facing Danger in the Helping Professions” available in Kindle Format. Click here for more information.

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Facing Danger in the Helping Professions

Just received a copy and I have to say it’s a great read! Get a copy – available via Amazon or through the Open University Press – recommend it to friends and review it on Amazon.

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Hearing Healthy Voices

At a time when DSM-V would have us classify just about anything vaguely different as a disorder it is good to be reminded that auditory hallucinations can be healthy. The study below offers further confirmation of Romme’s assertion that health/ill health lies not in the hallucinations themselves, but our relationship with them:

J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2012 Oct 15;
Auditory hallucinations as a personal experience: analysis of non-psychiatric voice hearers’ narrations.
Faccio E, Romaioli D, Dagani J, Cipolletta S
ACCESSIBLE SUMMARY: Auditory hallucinations are voices heard speaking with the hearer or discussing his or her thoughts or behaviours. They are common also among non-psychiatric population and may be a positive experience. These hallucinations cannot be considered merely as symptoms because they may have an adaptive function. We should avoid trying to helping voice hearers to eliminate or deny voices, and rather we should help them to feel allowed to preserve their voices. ABSTRACT: This exploratory research investigates the phenomenon of non-psychiatric auditory hallucinations from the perspective of the voice hearer, evaluating the possibility that this experience can contribute the maintenance and adaptation of the hearer’s personal identity system. A semi-structured interview was administered to 10 Italian voice hearers, six men and four women, aged 18-65 years, who had never been in contact with any mental health services because of the voices, even though some of them had been hearing voices for decades. Participants were not distressed or worried about the voices; on the contrary they developed their own understanding, personal coping resources and beliefs in relation to the positive functions of the voices. These results indicate that voices cannot be considered merely as symptoms, but may be seen also as adaptation systems. Consequently, we should avoid trying to helping voice hearers to eliminate or deny voices, and rather we should help them to feel allowed to preserve them.
© 2012 Blackwell Publishing.
Affiliation: Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Pedagogy and Applied Psychology, University of Padua, Padova, Italy.

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Facing Danger in the Helping Professions

We now have an estimated publication date of 8th April 2013.

Pre-orders can be placed with OUP at http://www.mcgraw-hill.co.uk/html/0335245838.html or Amazon at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Facing-Danger-Helping-Professions-approach/dp/0335245838/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1350583250&sr=8-1

Further information about the book can be found at www.facingdanger.com

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, psychosis, self-harm, Suicide, trauma, Violence, , , , , , ,

Jealousy, Violence and the Othello Syndrome

Here’s an interesting review of the Othello Syndrome in dementia…

Psychiatry Clin. Neurosci. 2012 Oct; vol. 66(6) pp. 467-73
Dangerous passion: Othello syndrome and dementia.
Cipriani G, Vedovello M, Nuti A, di Fiorino A
Jealousy is a complex emotion that most people have experienced at some time in life; pathological jealousy refers primarily to an irrational state. Othello syndrome is a psychotic disorder characterized by delusion of infidelity or jealousy; it often occurs in the context of medical, psychiatric or neurological disorders. At least 30% of cases in the literature show a neurological basis for their delusion of infidelity, although its biological basis is not fully understood. The purpose of this paper is to examine the phenomenon of pathological jealousy in people with dementia. We searched the electronic databases for original research and review articles on Othello syndrome in demented patients using the search terms ‘Othello syndrome, morbid jealousy, pathological jealousy, delusional disorders, dementia’. Convictions about the partner’s infidelities may form the content of psychopathological phenomena, such as delusions. Delusional jealousy is a frequent problem in dementia. Coexistent delusions and hallucinations are frequent. The violence in demented patients suffering from this syndrome is well documented and forensic aspects are highlighted. There are no systematic researches about the clinical characteristics of Othello syndrome in persons suffering from dementia, but only case reports and it is not possible to differentiate or compare differences of delusional jealousy across the various type of dementia or distinguish the syndrome in demented patients from the syndrome in other psychiatric disorders. Frontal lobe dysfunction may be called into question in delineating the cause of the delusional jealousy seen in Othello syndrome.
© 2012 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2012 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

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Reduced thalamic volume in men with antisocial personality disorder or schizophrenia and a history of serious violence and childhood abuse

This is interesting because it lends further support to the idea that the thalamus is implicated, through faulty sensory filtering, both in the development of psychotic symptoms – particularly hallucinations – and also it’s relationship with violent behaviour.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22944337?dopt=Citation

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Different Worlds; working with hallucinations, delusions and paranoia

This dramatic course delivered by Dr Iain Bourne is being made available by Sitra

24th October 2012 in Southampton

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NHS Trust Guilty Following Fatal Stabbing of Care Worker

Care staff are having to work with increasingly challenging service users, often inappropriately placed, without adequate training or supervision. Another tragic death …
Central Bedfordshire Council

20 July: Sentencing of former Dunstable care home owner and county NHS Trust
A county NHS Trust and the owner of a former Dunstable care home have been sentenced after being found guilty of safety failings following the fatal stabbing of a care worker at a private residential care home in Dunstable.

Kathleen Bainbridge, 58, from Luton was killed at Abacus House, on Princes Street, on 24 August 2007 by resident Stephen Flatt, then aged 55, who attacked her with a knife from a kitchen. Fellow care worker Barbara Hill, from Dunstable, was also attacked when she went to help her colleague.

A joint investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and Central Bedfordshire Council found that Abacus House was not the correct care facility for Mr Flatt, who had been placed there by the Hertfordshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust.

A trial at Luton Crown Court heard he had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and that Abacus House staff had no expertise or training for dealing with people with this disorder, or for managing violent or aggressive behaviour.

Hertfordshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust was yesterday (19 July) fined £150,000 and ordered to pay costs of £326,346 for breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 for its failings in relation to the fatal incident after being prosecuted by HSE.

The council brought proceedings at the same time against the owner of Abacus House, Chelvanayagam Menna, who was fined £75,000 and ordered to pay costs of £338,996 after being found guilty of breaching Sections 2(1) and 3(1) of the same Act.

After the sentencing HSE Inspector Karl Howes said: “This was a tragic incident that left a family without a wife, mother and grandmother. No-one expects to go to work and never return home.

“Care homes have a duty not only to protect the safety of their residents but their staff as well. The NHS Trust failed to adequately assess the risks that were posed to staff and other residents from placing Mr Flatt in Abacus House.

“I hope this will make all NHS Trusts and care facilities carefully consider the procedures that they have in place during patient placement.”

Councillor Budge Wells, Deputy Executive Member for Sustainable Communities, Services at Central Bedfordshire Council said: “The legal process has been long and difficult, particularly for Mrs Bainbridge’s family but also for her former colleagues – especially Mrs Hill.

“Of course the trial of Stephen Flatt had to take initial priority and once this was concluded the police instigated a further investigation of the Trust and care home owner. However the Council and HSE cooperated closely on their investigation from the outset and were in a position to progress with proceedings as soon as the police cleared the way.

“All concerned in the case hope that the right lessons are learned from this tragedy and that nothing of a similar nature occurs in future.”

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