Impact News

Responding to Violence, Suicide, Psychosis and Trauma

Edge of Darkness & The Razor’s Edge

8th October 2016. Nottingham Counsellor’s Group are staging this unique “fringe theatre” style training workshop next Saturday and still have a few places available. This workshop is almost exclusively available to closed “in-house” groups which means that it is virtually impossible for individual participants to attend. This is the only opportunity this year so act fast! If you are interested e-mail nottingham.counsellors@gmail.com to book your place.

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, self-harm, Suicide, Uncategorized, , , , , , , ,

Dangerous Behaviour: Open Programme Workshop, London, 25.04.15

Due to the cutbacks it has become near impossible for individual applicants to attend the “Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour” workshop which is now almost exclusively an “in-house” bespoke programme. None-the-less, Mosaic Training are hosting an open course in London on 25th April. As this may be the only opportunity this year and you are interested, you should act quickly. The workshop costs only £89.95 and details can be found here

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, psychosis, self-harm, Suicide, trauma, Violence, , , , , , ,

Suicide – a casual affair?

ken070912.001.003.FAIRFAX.melb.s/age news  CRYING.photograph by ken irwin  shows  generic single eye crying SPECIAL 111

ken070912.001.003.FAIRFAX.melb.s/age news CRYING.photograph by ken irwin shows generic single eye crying SPECIAL 111

Some while ago I was delivering a training course on “dangerous behaviour” to a housing association when a man popped his head around the door and enquired as to whether this was the “Ladder Awareness Training.” I have to confess, to my shame, I could not prevent myself from bursting out into laughter. Could there really be such a thing as a workshop for grown ups on how to use a ladder? Yet I was the one being silly – an organisation should discharge its responsibility to ensure the safety of its staff and the public.

Now compare this to what we do about suicide. Suicide is the most common cause of death in men under the age of 35 (Five Years On, Department Of Health, 2005) and it’s estimated that around one million people will die by suicide worldwide each year – a lot more than die falling off a ladder! Incredibly, many mental health professionals receive NO training in understanding, assessing and responding to suicidal behaviour. I recently reviewed a M.Sc Forensic Psychology course and, even though the suicide rate in prison is reckoned to be 12 times that of the general public, suicide did not feature at all on the syllabus.

Often friends and family have to wait for a loved one to make an attempt on their life before they get any help – the silver lining should be that at last they will be in the safe and competent hands of the professionals. Except they are not. Acute mental health units often do little more than observe, restrict and medicate – they do not even effectively assess risk even though that is one of their primary roles.

A woman, following a suicide attempt, is admitted to hospital on a Section 2 of the Mental Health Act. A nurse asks some questions to help ascertain whether she really wished to die (she does). During her time in the acute mental health unit no further formal assessment of suicide risk is made and as she declines medication no treatment is offered. Her suicide attempt is viewed as a response to “situational stress” and yet no-one investigates whether her situation was getting better or worse while in hospital (it was getting a whole lot worse). None-the-less, the psychiatrist says she looked happier and told him she wouldn’t hurt herself (an unexplained improvement is an indicator of acute suicide risk and 50% of in-patients dissemble prior to taking their lives) – so takes he her off the Section and allows her leave. She doesn’t return on time and eventually she is found by a helicopter rescue team by a railway track. Still there is no re-assessment of suicide risk and she is allowed to continue taking leave from the ward – despite the the fact that best predictor of future behaviour is past behaviour and it is well-known that suicide risk varies enormously over time. She starts making a list of her possessions (putting things in order?) and tells friends and family not to visit (another indicator of suicide risk), but does check that they are coping with her dog. Prior to the current crisis she had always said that the one reason she would never kill herself was her dog – and yet during her whole time on the ward she never once asked to see him (the primary protective factor). The following day she had an important appointment and yet 15 minutes before she was allowed to leave the ward – no-one asked why. She failed to return on time and only did so after frantic calls from her mother. Still there was no re-appraisal of the situation. Later that evening she again asked to leave the ward and was again allowed to do so. This time she didn’t return …

The point is that less training and less skill was applied to keeping this woman alive than was offered to the man hoping to use his ladder. Why?

You might also be interested to read this Poor mental care blamed as mother burns herself to death. Whatever this is about its not lack of resources.

Filed under: Other Mental Health, self-harm, Suicide, Uncategorized, , , ,

Young People who Die in Custody

An important report from the Prison Reform Trust:

http://www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk/Portals/0/Documents/Fatally%20Flawed.pdf

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, self-harm, Suicide, trauma, Violence, , , , , ,

Self-harm, Risk and the Penal System

It can only get better! Follow the link below for more information.

http://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/publications/inspectorate-reports/hmipris/thematic-reports-and-research-publications/per-thematic.pdf

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, self-harm, Suicide, , , , , ,

Self-harm still not understood by GPs

Self-harm is a major concern for young people, friends, family, teachers and mental health professionals and yet still GPs – the first point of contact admit that they struggle to understand it.

http://www.cypnow.co.uk/cyp/news/1075072/gps-admit-failure-understand-self-harm?utm_content=&utm_campaign=231012_Daily&utm_source=Children%20%26%20Young%20People%20Now&utm_medium=adestra_email&utm_term=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cypnow.co.uk%2Fcyp%2Fnews%2F1075072%2Fgps-admit-failure-understand-self-harm

Filed under: Other Mental Health, self-harm, Suicide, , , ,

Facing Danger in the Helping Professions

We now have an estimated publication date of 8th April 2013.

Pre-orders can be placed with OUP at http://www.mcgraw-hill.co.uk/html/0335245838.html or Amazon at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Facing-Danger-Helping-Professions-approach/dp/0335245838/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1350583250&sr=8-1

Further information about the book can be found at www.facingdanger.com

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, psychosis, self-harm, Suicide, trauma, Violence, , , , , , ,

Gender Differences in Suicidal Behaviour in Adolescence

A cursory look at the statistics is enough to tell us that there are huge gender differences involved in suicidal (and self-harming) behaviour. Here’s an interesting study:

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/749692 #mentalhealth

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, self-harm, Suicide, , , , ,

How self-harm is treated in A&E

People who self-harm do not generally get a good deal when they are admitted to A&E (ER). Most of the evidence is anecdotal but here is an interesting study:

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/758299

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, self-harm, Suicide, , , , ,

Razor’s Edge: Suicide & Self-harm Workshop in Nottingham

Nottingham HLG are putting on an open access workshop delivered by Dr Iain Bourne on 27th November 2012. For further information and booking details visit:

http://www.hlg.org.uk/training/quarterly-training-schedule

If you would like this course to be delivered in-house visit www.dangerousbehaviour.com or email impact@dangerousbehaviour.com

Filed under: Impact Training, self-harm, Suicide, Uncategorized, , , , , , , ,