Impact News

Responding to Violence, Suicide, Psychosis and Trauma

Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour – London, 15th September 2017

Places are still available on this unique and explosive “fringe theatre” style training workshop. Mosaic Training are hosting it as a “Special Event” and making it available for individual applicants to apply. The cost is only £89.95 and you can find all the details HERE

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Dangerous Behaviour: Open Workshop – West Midlands, 20.03.2017

As I’ve said before, it is very difficult for individual participants to access this kind of training as it is almost exclusively delivered “in-house” to closed groups. Thankfully Mosaic Training & Consultancy are staging the dramatic “Fringe Theatre” style “Difficult, Disturbing and Dangerous Behaviour” workshop in Alvechurch next March and making places available for the remarkably cheap price of £89.95 pp. You can find the details HERE

Places may be at a premium so do book early to avoid disappoinment…

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Dangerous Behaviour Workshop: London, 24th October 2016

Mosaic Training are again staging an open access opportunity for individuals to attend the “Difficult, Disturbing and Dangerous Behaviour” workshop in London on 24th October 2016. This workshop is almost always delivered to closed groups on an in-house basis – so this will be the only opportunity to experience this “Fringe Theatre” style training event this year. Roll up!

For further information click HERE

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Dangerous Behaviour: Open Programme Workshop, London, 25.04.15

Due to the cutbacks it has become near impossible for individual applicants to attend the “Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour” workshop which is now almost exclusively an “in-house” bespoke programme. None-the-less, Mosaic Training are hosting an open course in London on 25th April. As this may be the only opportunity this year and you are interested, you should act quickly. The workshop costs only £89.95 and details can be found here

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, psychosis, self-harm, Suicide, trauma, Violence, , , , , , ,

2. Violence – Terror in the Mind

woman blurred head

So talking about the “Short, Fast Story” …

I was saying that violence is overwhelmingly a psychological affair so let me clarify what I mean. Violence is an act of aggression and yet it has relatively little to do with pain, injury or even force. We might stub our toe, fall off a bike, scald ourselves, be on the receiving end of fierce rugby tackle, or bash our head on a low doorway. The pain goes, the injury heals, we get on with our lives and forget all about it. Compare this with someone coming up to you and poking you in the chest, or spitting in your face. No real pain, injury or force – and yet you might be troubled by this for a long time.

Now let’s think about force a little more. Many of us feel that we would be at an immediate disadvantage because we are not particularly big or strong. Yet size and strength turn out not to be particularly significant – at least not in the way you expect. My best friend at school was huge – and well built – and yet he got bullied relentlessly by kids who were even smaller than me. I would tell him, “Rich, if not for you, for me, next time they do that to you – just sit on them” but he wouldn’t – his size and strength were his enemies, not his friends. Indeed when I consider some of the scariest people I have encountered, a lot of them have been remarkably small – but still scary!

Okay, many of us still say we are scared by violence – and yet the truth is that violence isn’t particularly scary and sometimes isn’t scary at all! What is scary is the fear of violence – the dreadful anticipation of what might happen as your sympathetic nervous system prepares you for the worst. When the violence takes place there are a whole host of emergency psychological processes that can take over – emotions can be de-activated, time can expand or collapse, dissociative processes engaged and the whole experience can feel unreal. After, of course, there is the trauma – the shattered belief system, the constant ruminations, the nightmares and flashbacks, disturbed arousal, avoidance and the feeling of pervasive danger. The violence itself is the least troublesome part.

The reason we fear violence is because it throws us (psychologically) into the “unknown.” Reason, understanding, reflection and problem-solving – the bed fellows of much of our professional practice – leave the room. Instead of reflecting, we are called on to react – faster than we can think, with little margin for error and possibly catastrophic consequences. We are lost, on our own and without a map.

Well that is where I come in (www.dangerousbehaviour.com ).

In the next posting I will begin to lay down the theoretical foundations to a new approach to understanding and responding to violence – or if you are impatient you could always buy my book! (www.facingdanger.com).

Finally if you want to learn about violence through a fringe theatre style training workshop, Mosaic Training are putting on “Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour” in London on 27th November. Click here for details.

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, Uncategorized, Violence, , , , ,

1. Violence – The Long and the Short Stories

man staring

Since not everyone is going to attend one of my courses (www.dangerousbehaviour.com) or read my book (www.facingdanger.com) I thought I’d write a series of short posts on violence for general consumption.

When you look into the literature and at the work of clinical and forensic psychologists on violence it is almost exclusively about what I call “The Long, Slow Story.” It is about understanding the profile of violent offenders, identifying the antecedents of violence, assessing the risk of future violent offending and the treatment of violent offenders. These are matters open to rigorous scientific investigation. It is not, however, the whole of the story. The other part is “The Short, Fast Story” and that is where I come in. This involves the violent encounter itself as it happens second by second and the highly dynamic interplay between the various protagonists.

As professionals, violent behaviour is something we want to change and in “The Long, Slow Story” we can draw upon the established therapeutic literature. When addressing “The Short, Fast Story” however, that literature doesn’t help much – ignoring someone who is about to smash a bottle into your face doesn’t work, nor does challenging distorted cognitions! So it is assumed that when push comes to shove we have little influence over the aggressor’s behaviour.

Training, therefore, tends to focus on preventing or minimising the risk of violence to staff, or moves into physical restraint and breakaway techniques. Both are important and laudable and yet between the two an important gap exists – and that gap is that is overwhelmingly psychological.

In my next posting, I will explain why this so …

A final plug … there are still a few places left on the “Difficult, Disturbing and Dangerous Behaviour” workshop in London on 27th November. This is the only opportunity this year for individuals to attend. For details click here.

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Survey of Violence in Social care 2013

Community Care’s latest investigation into violence in social work and social care

http://www.communitycare.co.uk/violence-against-social-care-staff-2013/

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Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour

Video about the Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour workshops by Iain Bourne

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Skills in Managing Dangerous Psychotic Behaviour – Part Two

The second part to my YouTube discussion of Psychosis Containment Skills is now available at

Enjoy!

Iain

Filed under: Other Mental Health, psychosis, Violence, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Facing Danger” now available in Kindle format

Amazon have now made “Facing Danger in the Helping Professions” available in Kindle Format. Click here for more information.

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