Impact News

Responding to Violence, Suicide, Psychosis and Trauma

Skills in Managing Dangerous Psychotic Behaviour – Part Two

The second part to my YouTube discussion of Psychosis Containment Skills is now available at

Enjoy!

Iain

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Filed under: Other Mental Health, psychosis, Violence, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Managing Dangerous Psychotic Behaviour – On YouTube

Iain Bourne discusses the principles underpinning Psychosis Containment Skills – or the interactive, face-face professional skills used in responding to immediately dangerous  psychotic behaviour. Features include the relationship between psychosis and violence; dysphoric vs reactive drivers; how to spot whether the psychosis is driving the behaviour; the differential role of hallucinations, delusions and paranoia; the involvement of persecutory and command auditory hallucinations; the psychotic vs non-psychotic world; changes in the sensory filtering system; personal space and catastrophic reactions.

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Jealousy, Violence and the Othello Syndrome

Here’s an interesting review of the Othello Syndrome in dementia…

Psychiatry Clin. Neurosci. 2012 Oct; vol. 66(6) pp. 467-73
Dangerous passion: Othello syndrome and dementia.
Cipriani G, Vedovello M, Nuti A, di Fiorino A
Jealousy is a complex emotion that most people have experienced at some time in life; pathological jealousy refers primarily to an irrational state. Othello syndrome is a psychotic disorder characterized by delusion of infidelity or jealousy; it often occurs in the context of medical, psychiatric or neurological disorders. At least 30% of cases in the literature show a neurological basis for their delusion of infidelity, although its biological basis is not fully understood. The purpose of this paper is to examine the phenomenon of pathological jealousy in people with dementia. We searched the electronic databases for original research and review articles on Othello syndrome in demented patients using the search terms ‘Othello syndrome, morbid jealousy, pathological jealousy, delusional disorders, dementia’. Convictions about the partner’s infidelities may form the content of psychopathological phenomena, such as delusions. Delusional jealousy is a frequent problem in dementia. Coexistent delusions and hallucinations are frequent. The violence in demented patients suffering from this syndrome is well documented and forensic aspects are highlighted. There are no systematic researches about the clinical characteristics of Othello syndrome in persons suffering from dementia, but only case reports and it is not possible to differentiate or compare differences of delusional jealousy across the various type of dementia or distinguish the syndrome in demented patients from the syndrome in other psychiatric disorders. Frontal lobe dysfunction may be called into question in delineating the cause of the delusional jealousy seen in Othello syndrome.
© 2012 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2012 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

Filed under: Other Mental Health, psychosis, Violence, , , ,

Different Worlds; working with hallucinations, delusions and paranoia

This dramatic course delivered by Dr Iain Bourne is being made available by Sitra

24th October 2012 in Southampton

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, psychosis, , , , , ,

Open Courses “Different Worlds: working with hallucinations and delusions”

SITRA are now offering individual places on the “Different Worlds” course focussing on working with people who experience hallucinations and delusions:

SITRA – Different Worlds

Different worlds: Hallucinations and delusions

23 May 2012, London

25 May 2012, Southampton

24 October 2012, Southampton

This course is ideal for anyone who is working with service users with severe mental health issues. By the end of the course, participants will:

Have a better understanding of different types of hallucinations and their origins.
Have learned about a range of strategies to help service users cope with auditory hallucinations.
Know how to respond to services users in a psychotic crisis.
Have a greater awareness of different types of delusions and paranoid states.
Have a greater awareness of different approaches to the treatment of hallucinations, delusions and paranoia.
Price: Members £89/Non-members £129

Trainer: Dr Ian Bourne

Book now

Filed under: Impact Training, psychosis, , , , , ,