Impact News

Responding to Violence, Suicide, Psychosis and Trauma

Dangerous Behaviour Workshop: London, 24th October 2016

Mosaic Training are again staging an open access opportunity for individuals to attend the “Difficult, Disturbing and Dangerous Behaviour” workshop in London on 24th October 2016. This workshop is almost always delivered to closed groups on an in-house basis – so this will be the only opportunity to experience this “Fringe Theatre” style training event this year. Roll up!

For further information click HERE

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1. Violence – The Long and the Short Stories

man staring

Since not everyone is going to attend one of my courses (www.dangerousbehaviour.com) or read my book (www.facingdanger.com) I thought I’d write a series of short posts on violence for general consumption.

When you look into the literature and at the work of clinical and forensic psychologists on violence it is almost exclusively about what I call “The Long, Slow Story.” It is about understanding the profile of violent offenders, identifying the antecedents of violence, assessing the risk of future violent offending and the treatment of violent offenders. These are matters open to rigorous scientific investigation. It is not, however, the whole of the story. The other part is “The Short, Fast Story” and that is where I come in. This involves the violent encounter itself as it happens second by second and the highly dynamic interplay between the various protagonists.

As professionals, violent behaviour is something we want to change and in “The Long, Slow Story” we can draw upon the established therapeutic literature. When addressing “The Short, Fast Story” however, that literature doesn’t help much – ignoring someone who is about to smash a bottle into your face doesn’t work, nor does challenging distorted cognitions! So it is assumed that when push comes to shove we have little influence over the aggressor’s behaviour.

Training, therefore, tends to focus on preventing or minimising the risk of violence to staff, or moves into physical restraint and breakaway techniques. Both are important and laudable and yet between the two an important gap exists – and that gap is that is overwhelmingly psychological.

In my next posting, I will explain why this so …

A final plug … there are still a few places left on the “Difficult, Disturbing and Dangerous Behaviour” workshop in London on 27th November. This is the only opportunity this year for individuals to attend. For details click here.

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Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour

Video about the Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour workshops by Iain Bourne

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Skills in Managing Dangerous Psychotic Behaviour – Part Two

The second part to my YouTube discussion of Psychosis Containment Skills is now available at

Enjoy!

Iain

Filed under: Other Mental Health, psychosis, Violence, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Managing Dangerous Psychotic Behaviour – On YouTube

Iain Bourne discusses the principles underpinning Psychosis Containment Skills – or the interactive, face-face professional skills used in responding to immediately dangerous  psychotic behaviour. Features include the relationship between psychosis and violence; dysphoric vs reactive drivers; how to spot whether the psychosis is driving the behaviour; the differential role of hallucinations, delusions and paranoia; the involvement of persecutory and command auditory hallucinations; the psychotic vs non-psychotic world; changes in the sensory filtering system; personal space and catastrophic reactions.

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Facing Danger in the Helping Professions

We now have an estimated publication date of 8th April 2013.

Pre-orders can be placed with OUP at http://www.mcgraw-hill.co.uk/html/0335245838.html or Amazon at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Facing-Danger-Helping-Professions-approach/dp/0335245838/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1350583250&sr=8-1

Further information about the book can be found at www.facingdanger.com

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, psychosis, self-harm, Suicide, trauma, Violence, , , , , , ,

Gender Differences in Suicidal Behaviour in Adolescence

A cursory look at the statistics is enough to tell us that there are huge gender differences involved in suicidal (and self-harming) behaviour. Here’s an interesting study:

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/749692 #mentalhealth

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, self-harm, Suicide, , , , ,

How self-harm is treated in A&E

People who self-harm do not generally get a good deal when they are admitted to A&E (ER). Most of the evidence is anecdotal but here is an interesting study:

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/758299

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, self-harm, Suicide, , , , ,

Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour Workshop in Nottingham

Nottingham HLG are putting on an open access workshop delivered by Dr Iain Bourne on 28th November 2012. For further information and booking details visit:

http://www.hlg.org.uk/training/quarterly-training-schedule

If you are interested in this as an in-house course please visit www.dangerousbehaviour.com. The book that supports this course is due out in March 2013 and details can be found at www.facingdanger.com

Filed under: Impact Training, Violence, , , , , , , ,

Nepotistic patterns of violent psychopathy: evidence for adaptation?

I’ve seen a number of articles along similar lines of late. The argument seems to be that psychopaths rarely harm close family, while those with mental illnesses sometimes do. As a result, psychopathy could be seen as adaptive rather than disordered. On the other hand I have heard that in the US some judges are viewing psychopathy as a mitigating factor in sentencing. Strange, since most would hope that psychopaths, with full access to their faculties when they perpetrate atrocities should be locked up for longer?!

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22973244?dopt=Citation

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