Impact News

Responding to Violence, Suicide, Psychosis and Trauma

Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour

Video about the Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour workshops by Iain Bourne

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Skills in Managing Dangerous Psychotic Behaviour – Part Two

The second part to my YouTube discussion of Psychosis Containment Skills is now available at

Enjoy!

Iain

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Managing Dangerous Psychotic Behaviour – On YouTube

Iain Bourne discusses the principles underpinning Psychosis Containment Skills – or the interactive, face-face professional skills used in responding to immediately dangerous  psychotic behaviour. Features include the relationship between psychosis and violence; dysphoric vs reactive drivers; how to spot whether the psychosis is driving the behaviour; the differential role of hallucinations, delusions and paranoia; the involvement of persecutory and command auditory hallucinations; the psychotic vs non-psychotic world; changes in the sensory filtering system; personal space and catastrophic reactions.

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“Facing Danger” now available in Kindle format

Amazon have now made “Facing Danger in the Helping Professions” available in Kindle Format. Click here for more information.

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Facing Danger in the Helping Professions

Just received a copy and I have to say it’s a great read! Get a copy – available via Amazon or through the Open University Press – recommend it to friends and review it on Amazon.

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, psychosis, trauma, Violence, , , , , , , ,

Young People who Die in Custody

An important report from the Prison Reform Trust:

http://www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk/Portals/0/Documents/Fatally%20Flawed.pdf

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, self-harm, Suicide, trauma, Violence, , , , , ,

Facing Danger in the Helping Professions

We now have an estimated publication date of 8th April 2013.

Pre-orders can be placed with OUP at http://www.mcgraw-hill.co.uk/html/0335245838.html or Amazon at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Facing-Danger-Helping-Professions-approach/dp/0335245838/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1350583250&sr=8-1

Further information about the book can be found at www.facingdanger.com

Filed under: Impact Training, Other Mental Health, psychosis, self-harm, Suicide, trauma, Violence, , , , , , ,

Jealousy, Violence and the Othello Syndrome

Here’s an interesting review of the Othello Syndrome in dementia…

Psychiatry Clin. Neurosci. 2012 Oct; vol. 66(6) pp. 467-73
Dangerous passion: Othello syndrome and dementia.
Cipriani G, Vedovello M, Nuti A, di Fiorino A
Jealousy is a complex emotion that most people have experienced at some time in life; pathological jealousy refers primarily to an irrational state. Othello syndrome is a psychotic disorder characterized by delusion of infidelity or jealousy; it often occurs in the context of medical, psychiatric or neurological disorders. At least 30% of cases in the literature show a neurological basis for their delusion of infidelity, although its biological basis is not fully understood. The purpose of this paper is to examine the phenomenon of pathological jealousy in people with dementia. We searched the electronic databases for original research and review articles on Othello syndrome in demented patients using the search terms ‘Othello syndrome, morbid jealousy, pathological jealousy, delusional disorders, dementia’. Convictions about the partner’s infidelities may form the content of psychopathological phenomena, such as delusions. Delusional jealousy is a frequent problem in dementia. Coexistent delusions and hallucinations are frequent. The violence in demented patients suffering from this syndrome is well documented and forensic aspects are highlighted. There are no systematic researches about the clinical characteristics of Othello syndrome in persons suffering from dementia, but only case reports and it is not possible to differentiate or compare differences of delusional jealousy across the various type of dementia or distinguish the syndrome in demented patients from the syndrome in other psychiatric disorders. Frontal lobe dysfunction may be called into question in delineating the cause of the delusional jealousy seen in Othello syndrome.
© 2012 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2012 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

Filed under: Other Mental Health, psychosis, Violence, , , ,

Women who kill their partners

Assumptions that women who kill their male partners are usually chronic sufferers of domestic abuse, mentally ill and/or intoxicated may not be true. See:

Behav Sci Law. 2012 Sep 27;

Women Who Kill Their Mates.

Bourget D, Gagné P

Spousal homicide perpetrators are much more likely to be men than women. Accordingly, little research has focused on delineating characteristics of women who have committed spousal homicide. A retrospective clinical review of coroners’ files containing all cases of spousal homicide occurring in Quebec over a 20-year period was carried out. A total of 276 spousal homicides occurred between 1991 and 2010, with 42 homicides by female spouses and 234 homicides by male spouses. Differences between homicides committed by female offenders and male offenders are discussed, and findings on spousal homicide committed by women are compared with those of previous studies. Findings regarding offenses perpetrated by females in the context of mental illness, domestic violence, and homicide-suicide are explored. The finding that only 28% of the female offenders in the Quebec sample had previously been subjected to violence by their victim is in contrast to the popular belief and reports that indicate that most female-perpetrated spousal homicide occurs in self-defense or in reaction to long-term abuse. In fact, women rarely gave a warning before killing their mates. Most did not suffer from a mental illness, although one-fifth were acutely intoxicated at the time of the killing. In the vast majority of cases of women who killed their mates, there were very few indicators that might have signaled the risk and helped predict the violent lethal behavior. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID: 23015414
URL – http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23015414?dopt=Citation

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Difficult, Disturbing & Dangerous Behaviour Workshop in Nottingham

Nottingham HLG are putting on an open access workshop delivered by Dr Iain Bourne on 28th November 2012. For further information and booking details visit:

http://www.hlg.org.uk/training/quarterly-training-schedule

If you are interested in this as an in-house course please visit www.dangerousbehaviour.com. The book that supports this course is due out in March 2013 and details can be found at www.facingdanger.com

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